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Term Limits Are Not the Answer

By: Laurence M. Vance Franklin D. Roosevelt has the distinction of being the only man to be elected to the office of the presidency four times (1932, 1936, 1940, and ...

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We Need More of This!

By: Mike Maharrey Wyoming just stuck a huge middle finger up at the federal government. More and more, we’re seeing states simply ignore the feds. As just one example, we ...

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The “General Welfare” Clause

by JOHN W. BUGLER We Americans find ourselves faced with the disquieting specter of a national debt measured in trillions of dollars: a sum truly inconceivable. Many economists and politicians ...

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Today in History: The Missouri Compromise Signed into Law

By: Dave Benner Today in 1820, a set of bills that came to be known as the “Missouri Compromise” were signed into law by President James Monroe. Initially seen as ...

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Federal Vaccine Mandates: A Slippery Slope That Violates Informed Consent and State Sovereignty

By: Davis Taylor There is a strong move afoot to impose federal vaccination mandates. This is a slippery slope that would violate both the principle of informed consent and state ...

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The New Federalism and the New Federal Judiciary

by Thomas Ascik The federal lawsuit filed by fifteen blue states (and Michigan) to stop President Trump’s February 15 Proclamation on Declaring a National Emergency Concerning the Southern Border of ...

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Today in History: The General Government Inaugurated Under the Constitution

By: Dave Benner Today in history, on March 4th, 1789, the general government under the United States Constitution went into effect. The occasion represented the end of a bitter ratification ...

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The Birth of Confidence: The New Constitution

By: Jackson Pemberton On March 4, 2019, we commemorate the inauguration of the most transcendent legal document ever written: the Constitution of the United States of America. The thirteen colonies ...

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The Destructive Legacy of McCulloch v. Maryland

by Nelson Lund McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) is probably the Supreme Court’s single most influential case. Its importance arises largely from its doctrine of implied congressional powers, which has been ...

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Has The Constitution Failed?

By KrisAnne Hall, JD There is an argument that seems to resurface repeatedly that the Constitution has failed and as a result, American politics are out of control.  I have ...

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