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The Relevance of the Preamble to Constitutional Interpretation

March 11, 2019 Constitution / Government / History 0

By: Michael Rappaport The preamble to the United States Constitution is something that is widely employed within political and theoretical arguments but is virtually never relied upon in court cases ...

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The “General Welfare” Clause

by JOHN W. BUGLER We Americans find ourselves faced with the disquieting specter of a national debt measured in trillions of dollars: a sum truly inconceivable. Many economists and politicians ...

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Gouverneur Morris’s Rewriting of the Constitution

March 7, 2019 Constitution / Founders / History 0

by Mike Rappaport Recently, the Center for the Study of Constitutional Originalism held its annual Works-in-Progress Conference. One of the papers was written by Dean William Treanor of Georgetown Law ...

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Today in History: The Missouri Compromise Signed into Law

By: Dave Benner Today in 1820, a set of bills that came to be known as the “Missouri Compromise” were signed into law by President James Monroe. Initially seen as ...

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Today in History: The Boston Massacre

March 6, 2019 Government / History 0

By: Dave Benner Today in 1770, a violent incident unfolded on Boston’s King Street, where an agitated group of colonists swarmed around a group of British regulars. After a group ...

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A New Conservative Agenda

A governing philosophy for the twenty-first century by Daniel McCarthy What has been known as conservatism in the Republican party since Ronald Reagan left office, fully thirty years ago, has ...

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Today in History: The General Government Inaugurated Under the Constitution

By: Dave Benner Today in history, on March 4th, 1789, the general government under the United States Constitution went into effect. The occasion represented the end of a bitter ratification ...

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Shall We Defend Our Common History?

February 26, 2019 Censorship / Constitution / History 0

Roger Kimball The recent news that the University of Notre Dame, responding to complaints by some students, would “shroud” its twelve 134-year-old murals depicting Christopher Columbus was disappointing. It was ...

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What Would the Impartial Spectator Do?

February 14, 2019 History / Liberty / Power of the People 0

by Joseph Knippenberg Every spring, I have the great good fortune of reading and discussing Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments with a captive (i.e., general education) audience of sophomores. ...

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The Resurgent States of America

By: Jackson Pemberton The “United States of America” has become a misnomer. In 1776, the words “state” and “nation” were synonyms. The USA could have been named “The United Nations ...

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